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À partir du volume 57, la Revue de droit de McGill devint la première revue juridique canadienne à lancer une importante série de reportages podcast. L’objectif est d’augmenter la présence en ligne de la Revue en permettant un forum virtuel dans lequel les questions juridiques importantes peuvent être discutées, tout en se liant plus fortement avec notre audience. Veuillez envoyer un courriel à l’adresse journal.law@mcgill.ca pour toute question ou suggestion sur notre série podcast.
 


Causing a Comeau-tion, Part Two
Posted on Tue, 25 Sep 2018 00:35:53 +0000


Part one of Causing a Comeau-tion explored an attempt to break down interprovincial trade barriers in Canada through the use of litigation. In part two, we consider the consequences of the case. The Supreme Court ruled that the existing barriers to the sale of alcohol across provincial borders do not violate the constitution. While the case might initially appear to be a straightforward defeat for the litigants, the case could lead to other types of victories that prove it to be an example of successful legal mobilization. We get back in touch with Howard Anglin and Professor Christopher Manfredi, who share their thoughts on the decision and what its ultimate outcomes could be. This podcast is by Adam Casey, Podcast Editor for volume 64 of the McGill Law Journal.


Causing a Comeau-tion, Part One
Posted on Mon, 17 Sep 2018 00:10:01 +0000


“Free the Beer!” It’s become a rallying cry across Canada, largely thanks to a legal challenge brought before the Supreme Court in 2017 concerning the transfer of alcohol across provincial borders. In R v Comeau, the Court considered the constitutionality of interprovincial trade barriers on the sale of alcohol following an appeal brought by Gerard Comeau, a man who was fined for transporting alcohol from Quebec to New Brunswick. In this episode, we examine the struggle to break down interprovincial trade barriers, as well as the institutional and political pressures that make litigation the best (and perhaps the only) way to do it. McGill political science professor Christopher Manfredi tells us about legal mobilization, the process of using litigation to push for a policy goal. We also speak with Howard Anglin, Executive Director of the Canadian Constitution Foundation, who explains why the CCF decided to support Mr. Comeau’s case and what they hoped to achieve. This podcast was created and produced by Adam Casey and Emma Noradounkian, editors for volume 63 of the McGill Law Journal.


Justice pour les yézidies
Posted on Thu, 21 Jun 2018 23:11:37 +0000


La découverte des fosses communes à Sinjar en Iraq et l'ampleur des crimes commis par Daesh contre les minorités religieuses soulèvent d'importantes questions sur la ou les façons dont la justice peut être servie lors d'atrocités de masse telles que commises à l'encontre de la minorité yézidie. Pour nous entretenir sur le sujet, nous avons eu le privilège de rencontre le Professeur Payam Akhavan et Dr. Barzan Barzani de la Faculté de droit de McGill. Professeure Akhavan a été récemment désigné pour mener l'établissement d'une truth commission pour les yézidies. Dans le cadre de son sujet de recherche pendant son post-doctorat, Dr. Barzani a interrogé des centaines de victimes des crimes commis contre les yézidies. Ce podcast a été réalisé par Sofia Brault et Tiran Rahimian, rédacteurs juniors de la RDM. Produit par Sofia, Tiran et Emma Noradounkian, Rédactrice des podcasts de la RDM.  


Über Boss: Emploi et travail autonome à l’heure des nouvelles technologies perturbatrices
Posted on Sun, 13 May 2018 23:00:34 +0000


Précarité ou flexibilité? Barry Eidlin, Professeur de sociologie à l'université McGill, et Me Marc-Antoine Cloutier, avocat pour RTAM-Métallos, nous aident à mieux comprendre les nouvelles dynamiques du droit de l’emploi dans le contexte de l’économie de partage au travers des activités d’Uber au Québec. Ce podcast bilingue explore également l’impact des innovations technologiques sur les travailleurs, et les tensions existantes avec des cadres législatifs soi-disants rigides. L’innovation doit-elle nécessairement se faire au détriment des acquis sociaux et au prix d’entorses aux règles de droit? Comment accomoder les différents acteurs, qu’ils soient innovateurs, consommateurs ou travailleurs? Ce podcast a été réalisé par Francis Langlois et Alexis Leray, administrateurs juniors de la RDM. Produit par Francis, Alexis et Emma Noradounkian, Rédactrice des podcasts de la RDM.


Willfully Discriminatory? The Ability to Discriminate in Testamentary Dispositions
Posted on Tue, 27 Mar 2018 14:03:44 +0000


Should you be able to discriminate in a will? In 2016, the Ontario Court of Appeal ruled in Spence v BMO that if someone has made a will and their intention is clear, then no one can really challenge that will. At first glance, this sounds reasonable; people should be able to do what they want with their property when they die, but what if their will is being used in a discriminatory way? We spoke to McGill University Professor Angela Campbell and wills and estates practitioner Ian Hull about testamentary freedom and whether courts are willing to balance this concept with protections against discrimination. This podcast is by Karine Bédard and Meghan Pearson, Editors for volume 63 of the McGill Law Journal.   Produced by Karine, Meghan, and Emma Noradounkian, Podcast Editor for volume 63 of the McGill Law Journal.


Legal Personality of the Environment, part II
Posted on Fri, 01 Dec 2017 15:57:00 +0000


In Part II of Legal Personality of the Environment, we meet with Rob Clifford, a PhD student at Osgoode Hall and a member of the Tsawout First Nation, to discuss the concept of legal personality of the environment and its applicability in Canada. We notably discuss the transplantation of this doctrine in Canada, in light of its federal architecture and of the rich diversity of Indigenous legal traditions across the nation. This two-part podcast is by Raphaël Grenier-Benoit and Boris Kozulin, Executive Editor and Senior Editor for volume 63 of the McGill Law Journal. Produced by Alexis Hudon and Emma Noradounkian, Podcast Editors for volumes 62 and 63 of the McGill Law Journal.


Legal Personality of the Environment, part I
Posted on Thu, 30 Nov 2017 15:40:53 +0000


In this two-part podcast, we address the concept of Legal Personality of the Environment. This original idea was brought by Christopher Stone in Should Trees Have Standing?, which was published in the 1970s. Nowadays, granting legal personality to the environment is quite appealing for those who wish to protect natural resources for future generations.   In this first episode, we meet with Professor Jacinta Ruru, a Māori legal scholar from the Otago University in New Zealand, to discuss the doctrine and its application in New Zealand. More specifically, we discuss the Te Urewera Act, a legislation that grants legal personality to a former national park.   We discuss the implications of granting legal personality to the environment and stress that this approach is a way to incorporate Māori world views within New Zealand law.   This two-part podcast is by Raphaël Grenier-Benoit and Boris Kozulin, Executive Editor and Senior Editor for volume 63 of the McGill Law Journal.   Produced by Alexis Hudon and Emma Noradounkian, Podcast Editors for volumes 62 and 63 of the McGill Law Journal.


Clerks!, part II
Posted on Fri, 27 Oct 2017 18:30:26 +0000


In Part Two of Clerks! we visit the Supreme Court of Canada in Ottawa to hear about recent changes to the clerkship recruitment process. Gib van Ert outlines the new process, and we consider how clerkships reflect broader themes at play in our legal culture. Dans ce deuxième épisode de Clerks!, nous visitons la Cour Suprême du Canada, à Ottawa, pour en apprendre davantage sur les plus récents changements au processus de recrutement des auxiliaires juridiques. Gib van Ert détail le nouveau processus, puis nous considérons comment l’institution des auxiliaires juridiques reflète plus largement des grandes tendances de notre culture juridique. Music: "Diamond in the Back" by Curtis Mayfield, "Conspiracy," "Anticipation," and "Music of Beauty" by Fesliyan Studios, and introductory and concluding songs by Benjamin Goldman and David Nugent. This two-part podcast is by Éléna Drouin and Laura Alford, Editor-in-Chief and Executive Coordinating Editor for volume 63 of the McGill Law Journal. Produced by Alexis Hudon and Emma Noradounkian, Podcast Editors for volumes 62 and 63 of the McGill Law Journal.


Clerks!, part I
Posted on Thu, 26 Oct 2017 12:11:05 +0000


Where did Supreme Court Clerkships come from? What do clerks do? Why all the hype?? In this episode, we learn about the history and the role of clerkships at the Supreme Court of Canada from the 1960s to the present. We talk to Professors Shauna Van Praagh, Stephen Smith, and Lionel Smith about clerking at the end of the Dickson era. We then get the judge’s perspective through conversations with Justices Marie Deschamps and Frank Iacobucci. Tune in to episode two to hear about recent changes to the recruitment process, live from the SCC! Quelle est l’origine du programme des auxiliaires juridiques de la Cour suprême du Canada et pourquoi a-t-il été créé? Que font les clercs? Pourquoi un tel engouement? Dans cet épisode, on se penche sur l’histoire du programme des auxiliaires juridiques, ainsi que leurs fonctions, de 1960s au présent. On discute avec les Professeurs Shauna Van Praagh, Stephen Smith et Lionel Smith de leur expérience de clercs à la fin des années Dickson de la CSC. Puis, on s’entretient avec les Juges Marie Deschamps et Frank Iacobucci pour obtenir leur perspective. Restez à l’affut pour le deuxième épisode afin d’en apprendre davantage sur les changements récents au processus de recrutement, en direct de la Cour suprême du Canada! Music: "Battle Hymn of the Republic," "If I Could Turn Back Time" by Cher, and introductory and concluding songs by Benjamin Goldman and David Nugent. This two-part podcast is by Éléna Drouin and Laura Alford, Editor-in-Chief and Executive Coordinating Editor for volume 63 of the McGill Law Journal.  Produced by Alexis Hudon and Emma Noradounkian, Podcast Editors for volumes 62 and 63 of the McGill Law Journal. 


Supreme Court Fall 2017 Preview, featuring Professor Jamie Cameron
Posted on Wed, 27 Sep 2017 01:25:51 +0000


October 2nd marks the first day of the Supreme Court of Canada’s fall session. Among the 30 cases ranging from freedom of religion, equality rights, and contract law– to name a few on the docket– what are some major cases to look out for? With news of the Chief Justice’s retirement at the end of the fall session, what can we gather from the McLachlin Court’s legacy? Could an early announcement of the next Chief Justice affect the dynamic of the Court this fall?   On this episode, we addressed all of these questions and everything in between with one of Canada’s senior constitutional scholars, Professor Jamie Cameron. The words, interviews, and production of this podcast are by Emma Noradounkian, Podcast Editor for volume 63 of the McGill Law Journal.


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