Podcasts

Starting in Volume 57, the McGill Law Journal became the first Canadian law journal to launch a significant podcast series. In the years since, our podcasts have explored many of the most important issues in Canadian law, including debates about criminal justice or the structure of Canadian Federalism, as well as international issues like humanitarian crises or emerging norms like the legal personality of the environment. Each episode features interviews from prominent academics, practitioners, and other experts, many of whom have been directly involved in debates and decisions that continue to shape the law in Canada and around the world.

 

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Our episodes
Posted on 19 Sep 2019

Des robots en toges

L’intelligence artificielle (IA) est présentement au centre d’une profonde transformation technologique. D’aucuns croient également que l’IA façonnera la façon dont nous administrons et dont nous rendons la justice en permettant l’introduction de systèmes décisionnels automatisés dans l’administration publique. Mais cela sera-t-il pour le pire ou pour le mieux, et comment s’assurer que nous introduisions et utilisions cette technologie de façon responsable ?

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Posted on 20 Aug 2019

Cannabis Legalization at the Frontier

By signing Bill C-45, Canada became the second country in the world to legalize the recreational use of cannabis. Subsequent news coverage raised concerns about the potentially negative effects of legalization for Canadians, especially those crossing the US-Canadian border. In this podcast, we explore the practical implications of cannabis legalization, examining emerging issues related to workplace safety, privacy, property rights, the constitutional division of powers, and what Canadians can say to border officers if asked about cannabis use. We will hear from Me Joël Dubois, a practicing lawyer at Perley-Robertson, Hill & McDougall LLP and co-developer of the University of Ottawa’s Cannabis Law course. We will also hear from Mr. Henry Chang, a Toronto-based immigration lawyer and partner at Dentons. This podcast is produced by Talia Huculak and Lauren Weaver, associate editors for Volume 64 of the McGill Law Journal.

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Posted on 8 May 2019

Smart Cities: Who Owns the Data?

The city of Toronto is currently working with a private company to develop a “smart city”—a neighbourhood that incorporates the collection of big data into its urban design. Since its inception, the project has inspired debate about how data generated by the public/private partnerships ought to be used. In this podcast, we consider the implications of some of these questions, and ask who should own the data and intellectual property generated from projects that rely on both public and private investment. We will hear from Teresa Scassa, Canada Research Chair in information, law and policy at the University of Ottawa, and Natalie Raffoul, an IP lawyer called to the bar in Ontario with a practice that focuses on procurement, licensing, and other IP issues. This podcast is produced by Andrea Salguero and Adam Casey, editors for volume 64 of the McGill Law Journal.

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Posted on 25 Sep 2018

Causing a Comeau-tion, Part Two

Part one of Causing a Comeau-tion explored an attempt to break down interprovincial trade barriers in Canada through the use of litigation. In part two, we consider the consequences of the case. The Supreme Court ruled that the existing barriers to the sale of alcohol across provincial borders do not violate the constitution. While the case might initially appear to be a straightforward defeat for the litigants, the case could lead to other types of victories that prove it to be an example of successful legal mobilization. We get back in touch with Howard Anglin and Professor Christopher Manfredi, who share their thoughts on the decision and what its ultimate outcomes could be. This podcast is by Adam Casey, Podcast Editor for volume 64 of the McGill Law Journal.

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Posted on 17 Sep 2018

Causing a Comeau-tion, Part One

“Free the Beer!” It’s become a rallying cry across Canada, largely thanks to a legal challenge brought before the Supreme Court in 2017 concerning the transfer of alcohol across provincial borders. In R v Comeau, the Court considered the constitutionality of interprovincial trade barriers on the sale of alcohol following an appeal brought by Gerard Comeau, a man who was fined for transporting alcohol from Quebec to New Brunswick. In this episode, we examine the struggle to break down interprovincial trade barriers, as well as the institutional and political pressures that make litigation the best (and perhaps the only) way to do it. McGill political science professor Christopher Manfredi tells us about legal mobilization, the process of using litigation to push for a policy goal. We also speak with Howard Anglin, Executive Director of the Canadian Constitution Foundation, who explains why the CCF decided to support Mr. Comeau’s case and what they hoped to achieve. This podcast was created and produced by Adam Casey and Emma Noradounkian, editors for volume 63 of the McGill Law Journal.

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Posted on 21 Jun 2018

Justice pour les yézidies

La découverte des fosses communes à Sinjar en Iraq et l’ampleur des crimes commis par Daesh contre les minorités religieuses soulèvent d’importantes questions sur la ou les façons dont la justice peut être servie lors d’atrocités de masse telles que commises à l’encontre de la minorité yézidie. Pour nous entretenir sur le sujet, nous avons eu le privilège de rencontre le Professeur Payam Akhavan et Dr. Barzan Barzani de la Faculté de droit de McGill. Professeure Akhavan a été récemment désigné pour mener l’établissement d’une truth commission pour les yézidies. Dans le cadre de son sujet de recherche pendant son post-doctorat, Dr. Barzani a interrogé des centaines de victimes des crimes commis contre les yézidies. Ce podcast a été réalisé par Sofia Brault et Tiran Rahimian, rédacteurs juniors de la RDM. Produit par Sofia, Tiran et Emma Noradounkian, Rédactrice des podcasts de la RDM.  

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Posted on 13 May 2018

Über Boss: Emploi et travail autonome à l’heure des nouvelles technologies perturbatrices

Précarité ou flexibilité? Barry Eidlin, Professeur de sociologie à l’université McGill, et Me Marc-Antoine Cloutier, avocat pour RTAM-Métallos, nous aident à mieux comprendre les nouvelles dynamiques du droit de l’emploi dans le contexte de l’économie de partage au travers des activités d’Uber au Québec. Ce podcast bilingue explore également l’impact des innovations technologiques sur les travailleurs, et les tensions existantes avec des cadres législatifs soi-disants rigides. L’innovation doit-elle nécessairement se faire au détriment des acquis sociaux et au prix d’entorses aux règles de droit? Comment accomoder les différents acteurs, qu’ils soient innovateurs, consommateurs ou travailleurs? Ce podcast a été réalisé par Francis Langlois et Alexis Leray, administrateurs juniors de la RDM. Produit par Francis, Alexis et Emma Noradounkian, Rédactrice des podcasts de la RDM.

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Posted on 27 Mar 2018

Willfully Discriminatory? The Ability to Discriminate in Testamentary Dispositions

Should you be able to discriminate in a will? In 2016, the Ontario Court of Appeal ruled in Spence v BMO that if someone has made a will and their intention is clear, then no one can really challenge that will. At first glance, this sounds reasonable; people should be able to do what they want with their property when they die, but what if their will is being used in a discriminatory way? We spoke to McGill University Professor Angela Campbell and wills and estates practitioner Ian Hull about testamentary freedom and whether courts are willing to balance this concept with protections against discrimination. This podcast is by Karine Bédard and Meghan Pearson, Editors for volume 63 of the McGill Law Journal.   Produced by Karine, Meghan, and Emma Noradounkian, Podcast Editor for volume 63 of the McGill Law Journal.

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Posted on 1 Dec 2017

Legal Personality of the Environment, part II

In Part II of Legal Personality of the Environment, we meet with Rob Clifford, a PhD student at Osgoode Hall and a member of the Tsawout First Nation, to discuss the concept of legal personality of the environment and its applicability in Canada. We notably discuss the transplantation of this doctrine in Canada, in light of its federal architecture and of the rich diversity of Indigenous legal traditions across the nation. This two-part podcast is by Raphaël Grenier-Benoit and Boris Kozulin, Executive Editor and Senior Editor for volume 63 of the McGill Law Journal. Produced by Alexis Hudon and Emma Noradounkian, Podcast Editors for volumes 62 and 63 of the McGill Law Journal.

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Posted on 30 Nov 2017

Legal Personality of the Environment, part I

In this two-part podcast, we address the concept of Legal Personality of the Environment. This original idea was brought by Christopher Stone in Should Trees Have Standing?, which was published in the 1970s. Nowadays, granting legal personality to the environment is quite appealing for those who wish to protect natural resources for future generations.   In this first episode, we meet with Professor Jacinta Ruru, a Māori legal scholar from the Otago University in New Zealand, to discuss the doctrine and its application in New Zealand. More specifically, we discuss the Te Urewera Act, a legislation that grants legal personality to a former national park.   We discuss the implications of granting legal personality to the environment and stress that this approach is a way to incorporate Māori world views within New Zealand law.   This two-part podcast is by Raphaël Grenier-Benoit and Boris Kozulin, Executive Editor and Senior Editor for volume 63 of the McGill Law Journal.   Produced by Alexis Hudon and Emma Noradounkian, Podcast Editors for volumes 62 and 63 of the McGill Law Journal.

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